Vancouver Mom > Community Builder > Getting help for bright children struggling in conventional schools

Getting help for bright children struggling in conventional schools

eaton-arrowsmith

The tears, the frustration, the endless homework difficulties. If you have a child who continually struggles with school work, whose attempts at endless homework nearly always end in tears, and whose report cards never reflect the intelligent, vibrant child within, you are very familiar with the heartbreak of day-to-day conventional school.

It’s possible that your child has a learning disability, which can feel scary and overwhelming. Whether it’s trouble with reading, handwriting, tying shoelaces, spatial awareness, or other challenges, they can add up to your child feeling socially isolated and struggling with self esteem. The good news is that there are schools out there designed to help children with learning disabilities.

Eaton Arrowsmith is a Vancouver school that people from all over the world bring their children to attend. The school was founded on the research and findings around neuroplasticity, which is the practice of cognitive exercises that strengthen specific neural pathways.

The easiest way to understand what Eaton Arrowsmith does is they use mental exercises to help improve the brain’s capacity to learn. These exercises strengthen the weak areas of the brain that cause learning difficulties, which over time, help students remove the barriers to learning. The program they use was developed by Barbara Arrowsmith-Young who also had a severe learning disability when she was a child and young adult. She developed these exercises for herself and basically enabled herself to reach her learning potential – independently. That’s what makes EA different than other schools for children with learning disabilities: other schools believe in the older idea that your brain is your brain and you can’t change it, so they give kids tricks to work around the learning disability. Arrowsmith’s program believes you can strengthen your brain to, in many cases, remove the disability altogether.

You can read more about their method here.

Have a look at some moving personal stories from students and their parents:

 

This post is sponsored by one of our community builders, Eaton Arrowsmith

ea-logo-web-colour

Eaton Arrowsmith is a school that follows the Arrowsmith Program. Students rewire weaker brain areas instead of compensating for learning disabilities.

Related posts

Leave a comment

Comment
X